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Musabyimouna Edith & Lemurunyai Sandrine

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Musabyimouna Edith tells her daughter how she went from being a lazy, spoiled daughter, to a hardworking survivor and mother. She describes how she was able to survive the genocide partially through her own willingness to change, but largely through the benevolence of strangers who were willing to hide, clothe and feed her during the violence. In order to survive, Musabyimouna Edith relied on strangers to conceal her identity and endured several close encounters with potentially violent individuals. Lemurunyai Sandrine learns from her mother's experience of becoming independent quickly due to violence and death, and she now recognizes the importance of not only being obedient, but also being self-sufficient and open-minded.

"My advise to them is that they should learn to see themselves when they look at other people. We are all created in God's image;ethnic identity is something that came out of our bad past." Musabyimouna Edith

"She said we should live peacefully with everyone irrespective of his or her ethnic background." Lemurunyai Sandrine

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ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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