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Genocidal Loss

Mukandagijimava Epiphanie & Muhongwanseko Scholastique

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Mother and daughter open up to each other about love, loss, and marriage. The two women discuss many topics including religion, intimate relationships, and how dating practices have changed over time. Muhongwanseck Scholastique shares her concerns about her future with her mother Mukandagijimava Epiphanie, and asks about the secret to her parent’s good marriage. Mukandagijimava Epiphanie welcomes her daughter’s questions and says that relationships should be based on love, respect, and communication.

Uwamwezi Philomene & Dusabe Nicole

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Uwamwezi Philomene talks to Nicole about the difficulties parents face when talking to their children, and how people today can manage busy schedules to remember the past. Dusabe Nicole also wonders about how they can regain trust and love in society when certain people are known to have been murderers, and Uwamwezi Philomene counsels her in love.

Mukayiranga Verena & Mugisha Gabriel & Sharangabo Jean de Dieu

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Mukayiranga Verena is speaking with two of her adopted sons, Mugisha Gabriel and Sharangabo Jean de Dieu. She tells stories of her struggles with discrimination between the different ethnicities and how there was nothing but love between all Rwandese people before the colonists arrived. Verena shares how she lived in paralyzing fear during the war saying “I could not sleep well; I would think that people would come to kill us.” Despite being traumatized by her experiences she overcame her fear and shares her story with her sons.

Wherny Namara & Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

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Through conversation, Consolatrice is able to find peace and strengthen her relationship with members of the community. Wherny helps her understand that hatred will not be helpful for the future of Rwanda.

"I developed a sense of love, the love of my enemies. I felt like I'm obliged, I felt like I have to pray for even those who hate me according to the story we shared." Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Twahirwa Deborah & Tuyishimire Florence

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When a large number of children were orphaned by the genocide, it became difficult for many of them to find people to replace their families and get advice from. Twahirwa Deborah tells Tuyishimire Florence the ways orphans can see love and comfort in the world so they can hope for a brighter future, and how all Rwandans must forget about their differences and become one family.

Umamwezi Philomene & Masengesho Rosine

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Both Masengesho Rosine and her grandmother have experienced the hardships that women faced, the genocide, and life as orphans. But have never before spoken to one another about their lives. Umamwezi Philomene acknowledges the hurt and suffering women in particular have struggled with in Rwandan history, but sees a bright future for Masengesho Rosine through her youth and educational opportunities. Most importantly, she reminds her that all Rwandans should stand together for justice and peace, and being an orphan does not mean you cannot find a parent to advise you in times of need.

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Murindahabi Canisius

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Murindahabi Canisius's father died when he was too young to know him well, so he asks his sister Mukagakwaya Beatrice to share stories about their father, grandfather, and the ways in which they affected her life. Mukagakwaya Beatrice talks of her father hiding refugees in their home, the strength he inspired her with to survive as a widow, and even how he managed his farm and his favorite foods.

Umazikungu Beatrice & Gashumba Yves Fabrice

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Although Gashumba Yves Fabrice and longs for a peaceful future, he still has a hard time forgiving those involved in the genocide and fears the resurgence of conflict. His friend Umazikungu Beatrice reminds him that kindness toward everyone is the best way to prove that Rwanda can move forward, and it is better to be remembered for acts of kindness rather than the brief satisfaction of taking revenge and being remembered for evil.

Umuraza Nassim & Isimbi Tresor

Because he seems older than his years and keeps asking her, Umuraza Nassim, a poet and peacemaker, finally decides to tell her son, Isimbi Tresor, the truth about what happened to his grandparents during the genocide. These memories were so painful and identities of the killers still remain unknown, so she has been unable to talk to her son about her family’s history until now. In telling her story, Umuraza Nassim describes the hardships that she went through during and after the genocide, and also explains the fate of Tutsis and the events leading up to the genocide.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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