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Rwandan culture

Mukandagijimava Epiphanie & Muhongwanseko Scholastique

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Mother and daughter open up to each other about love, loss, and marriage. The two women discuss many topics including religion, intimate relationships, and how dating practices have changed over time. Muhongwanseck Scholastique shares her concerns about her future with her mother Mukandagijimava Epiphanie, and asks about the secret to her parent’s good marriage. Mukandagijimava Epiphanie welcomes her daughter’s questions and says that relationships should be based on love, respect, and communication.

Uwamwezi Philomene & Dusabe Nicole

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Uwamwezi Philomene talks to Nicole about the difficulties parents face when talking to their children, and how people today can manage busy schedules to remember the past. Dusabe Nicole also wonders about how they can regain trust and love in society when certain people are known to have been murderers, and Uwamwezi Philomene counsels her in love.

Mukangiruwonsanga Agnes & Ntamitondero Muneza Yves

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Mukangiruwnsanga Agnes talks to Ntamitondero Muneza Yves about the history of his own name because he has been ashamed of it, and how their personal history and Rwandan history have shaped the naming of youths. She also shares her personal story growing up as one of ten children, and counsels Ntamitondero Muneza Yves on how to be a useful and meaningful member of society for a better future, with tips from learning to keep secrets, to developing a culture of peace.

Kwizera Samuel & Igihozo Cindy Providence

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Kwizera Samuel shares with his niece, Igihozo Cindy Providence, how people lived together in harmony regardless of ethnicity. All people in Rwanda had love for one another before the tragedy of the genocide. Emergency vehicles would not stop to check the ethnicity of a patient before taking them to the hospital. In fact, those riding the emergency vehicles would all be of different ethnicities in the first place. In those days, people helped one another.

Munganyinka Melaine & Murebwayire Marie Claire

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Munganyinka Melaine lived in a time when girls were restricted to house duties, no education, and general strictness which boys were not subject to. Girls would stay home and make butter, weave, and take care of kids. Women could have fun too, but it all took place within the strict confines of the old Rwandan culture and way of life.

Urayeneza Sauda & Mugwaneza Noella

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In the days of Mugwaneza Noella’s grandparents, children remained naked until they were the age of 10, at which point they would be clothed with dressed skin leather. Mugwaneza Noella and her aunt, Urayeneza Sauda, discuss the differences between the past and present culture and how it has affected the youth of today.

“Did your mother never help you or tell your brother to help you? Could your brothers plead for you so that you may go to school?” Mugwaneza Noella

Uwamahoro Ernestine & Uwimana Deogratias

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Uwimana Deogratias is curious about the level of education in Rwanda, and he hopes his elder, Uwamahoro Ernestine, can give him more knowledge on the topic. He was concerned with how uneducated the older generation is, so Uwamahoro Ernestine explains how difficult it was to study during her youth. Comparing the days of her youth when it was rare to see anyone pass their education to today when even those with university degrees may not be guaranteed employment, the times have changed immensely.

Ntibanyendera Elissam & Muhawenimana Genevieve

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As a young woman, Muhawenimana Genevieve has burning questions concerning the way life was in the time of her elders. She invites her uncle to help her answer these questions. The Rwanda of today is far removed from the Rwanda of the past, as Muhawenimana Genevieve discovers. Families and the land they owned used to be large, and money did not even exist. Instead, life depended on one’s resources such as livestock and property. She asks about the shift in norms for boys and girls such as the issue of HIV/AIDS and rebelliousness in today’s youth.

Zimulinda Pheneas & Shingiro Remy

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Full of questions concerning the history of religion in Rwanda and how Rwandan culture of the past differs from that of today, Shingiro Remy listens intently to the words of Zimulinda Pheneas, his counselor. Zimulinda Pheneas discusses the origins of churches in Rwanda, the issues of teen pregnancy and drug abuse, how children were traumatized even without going through the genocide, the effect of good parenting and community parenting, and his philosophy on education. He goes into detail on such subjects as rape, gendered violence, and prostitution.

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Muvunyi Olivier

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Muvunyi Olivier has many questions for his mother, Mukagakwaya Beatrice, about how Rwandan culture has changed since her childhood. Mukagakwaya Beatrice provides descriptions of the courtship rituals in the past, dress and behavior during weddings, and the gender norms that governed women’s lives. She tells her son that women today are not as respectful of traditional cultured or their elders. She advises young people to be peaceful and content with what they have. Muvunyi Olivier welcomes his mother’s story and wonders about these traditions in contemporary society.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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