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Ntibanyendera Elissam & Muhawenimana Genevieve

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As a young woman, Muhawenimana Genevieve has burning questions concerning the way life was in the time of her elders. She invites her uncle to help her answer these questions. The Rwanda of today is far removed from the Rwanda of the past, as Muhawenimana Genevieve discovers. Families and the land they owned used to be large, and money did not even exist. Instead, life depended on one’s resources such as livestock and property. She asks about the shift in norms for boys and girls such as the issue of HIV/AIDS and rebelliousness in today’s youth.

Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Umuraza Nassim & Isimbi Tresor

Because he seems older than his years and keeps asking her, Umuraza Nassim, a poet and peacemaker, finally decides to tell her son, Isimbi Tresor, the truth about what happened to his grandparents during the genocide. These memories were so painful and identities of the killers still remain unknown, so she has been unable to talk to her son about her family’s history until now. In telling her story, Umuraza Nassim describes the hardships that she went through during and after the genocide, and also explains the fate of Tutsis and the events leading up to the genocide.

Musabyimana Epiphanie & Hakizimana Justin

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Hakizimana Justin and Musabyimana Epiphanie are siblings who lost their parents during the genocide. Since Hakizimana Justin was very young at the time, he wants his older sister to tell him about their family, ethnic discrimination, and the many hardships that she went through after the genocide. Since he has no other adult to turn to, Hakizimana Justin also asks Musayimana Epiphanie for advice about how he should behave in different settings. As any good older sister would do, she advises him on the proper way to live his life.

Mukansanze Imfura Chantal & Turatsinze Jimmy

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Mukansanze Imfura Chantal explains to Turatsinze Jimmy how he became an orphan and how he got to where he is today. She urges him to continue his education and, equally importantly, to treat everyone as equals, regardless of ethnicity, wealth, or status, not only for himself, but for the future of the country. Turatsinze Jimmy describes his hazy memories as a young boy about the origins of genocide—why did a plane crash start a war? Was there already a plan in place to start the killing? Has there always been a rift between ethnicities?

Murekatete Justine & Tuyiseuge Claudette

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Two sisters orphaned by genocide, Murekatete Justine and Tuyiseuge Claudette, discuss how they can recover from the trauma they endured. Tuyiseuge Claudette tells her sister of the trouble she has remaining motivated to stay in school and continue working for her future. Murekatete Justine responds with her own inspirational story about raising two children and her sister singlehandedly.

Mukagatare Laetitia & Uwihoreye Seraphine

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Uwihoreye Seraphine asks her aunt, Mukagatare Laetitia for advice on dating, intimate relationships, and the meaning of personal faith. Mukagatare Laetitia talks about her own adolescence and stresses the importance of women obtaining an education before they start worrying about men. Aunt and niece discuss Rwandan gender norms and Uwihoreye Seraphine learns how to protect herself in future relationships.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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