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Umuraza Nassim & Isimbi Tresor

Because he seems older than his years and keeps asking her, Umuraza Nassim, a poet and peacemaker, finally decides to tell her son, Isimbi Tresor, the truth about what happened to his grandparents during the genocide. These memories were so painful and identities of the killers still remain unknown, so she has been unable to talk to her son about her family’s history until now. In telling her story, Umuraza Nassim describes the hardships that she went through during and after the genocide, and also explains the fate of Tutsis and the events leading up to the genocide.

Rwihisha Tharcisse & Murorunkwere Janet

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Ruhigisha Tharcisse and Murorunkwere Janet have never spoken about his past as a refugee who went from country and country after 1959, living in poverty in refugee camps. He eventually trained himself in a skill and was able to sustained himself. She has many questions for him. Ruhigisha Tharcisse has advice for her about how to sustain herself and has high hopes that she can survive with dignity.

Muhizi Jean Claude & Masengesho Jean de Dieu

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Muhizi Jean Claude wants to inspire his friend Masengesho Jean de Dieu to be hopeful about the future by reflecting on how much has changed since his youth. Muhizi Jean Claude talks about how the segregation that existed in schools and how political instability contributed to the genocide. In answer to Masengesho Jean de Dieu’s question about ways for people to heal their emotional pain, Muhizi Jean Claude emphasizes youth breaking the cycle of ethnic discrimination.

Mukamana Theopista & Umuvandimwe Marie Claire

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Umuvandimwe Marie Claire looks up to Mukamana Theopista, and wants to hear about her friend's past in order to learn from her. When asked about what “was your happiest moment and what was your saddest moment,” Mukamana Theopista discusses growing up in poverty and moving through many tragedies into a positive present. She thanks God and her loving husband for supporting her through house fires, illness, and lost children. She encourages Umuvandimwe Marie Claire to be thankful for what she has and to have faith that she will have a good partner and strong marriage.

Bankundiye Albertine & Nyinawumuntu Violette

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With a focus on the importance of kindness and acceptance, Bankundiye Albertine tells her friend Nyinawumuntu Violette about her family’s past. She talks about her father, an educated man who was killed in the genocide, who would take children off the streets and help them get into schools. His good deeds and reputation inform Bankundiye Albertine’s actions and continue to keep her safe. She also mentions her challenges with her mother’s side of the family. Nyinawumuntu Violette offers consolation and advises Bankundiye Albertine to be loving towards her family and they will love her back.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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