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Uwamwezi Philomene & Dusabe Nicole

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Uwamwezi Philomene talks to Nicole about the difficulties parents face when talking to their children, and how people today can manage busy schedules to remember the past. Dusabe Nicole also wonders about how they can regain trust and love in society when certain people are known to have been murderers, and Uwamwezi Philomene counsels her in love.

Wherny Namara & Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

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Through conversation, Consolatrice is able to find peace and strengthen her relationship with members of the community. Wherny helps her understand that hatred will not be helpful for the future of Rwanda.

"I developed a sense of love, the love of my enemies. I felt like I'm obliged, I felt like I have to pray for even those who hate me according to the story we shared." Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

Nyirahabimana Consolee & Mukeshimana Godelive

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Nyirahabimana Consolee tells Mukeshimana Godelive stories about the way young girls acted before she was born, drawing on her own life and the stories her aunts told her. They include everything from weaving, the to difficulties with accepting advice, dealing with mothers-in-law, giving birth, changing traditions about co-wives, and much more.

"I can’t confirm that all the poor take a wrong way which will cause them more pain because of poverty. So even the poor can keep their dignities in their poverty and finally get their own families." Nyirahabimana Consolee

Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Habumukiza Bernard & Mujyanama Eric

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Habumukiza Bernard talks to his student, Mujyanama Eric, about the importance of education and his decision to become a teacher, reminding him that the most important aspect of employment isn't always how much money you make.

"When you are at school you have to be united, to know that you are all students from the same
school, you are all Rwandans; you are all young and consider yourself as twins who have the
same mother." Habumukiza Bernard

"What is the secret of doing the same job for a long time?" Mujyanama Eric

Twahirwa Deborah & Tuyishimire Florence

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When a large number of children were orphaned by the genocide, it became difficult for many of them to find people to replace their families and get advice from. Twahirwa Deborah tells Tuyishimire Florence the ways orphans can see love and comfort in the world so they can hope for a brighter future, and how all Rwandans must forget about their differences and become one family.

Umamwezi Philomene & Masengesho Rosine

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Both Masengesho Rosine and her grandmother have experienced the hardships that women faced, the genocide, and life as orphans. But have never before spoken to one another about their lives. Umamwezi Philomene acknowledges the hurt and suffering women in particular have struggled with in Rwandan history, but sees a bright future for Masengesho Rosine through her youth and educational opportunities. Most importantly, she reminds her that all Rwandans should stand together for justice and peace, and being an orphan does not mean you cannot find a parent to advise you in times of need.

Umazikungu Beatrice & Gashumba Yves Fabrice

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Although Gashumba Yves Fabrice and longs for a peaceful future, he still has a hard time forgiving those involved in the genocide and fears the resurgence of conflict. His friend Umazikungu Beatrice reminds him that kindness toward everyone is the best way to prove that Rwanda can move forward, and it is better to be remembered for acts of kindness rather than the brief satisfaction of taking revenge and being remembered for evil.

Mukakayange Veronique & Muyisenge Onaan

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Muyisenge Onaan wants to learn about his family history and the stories his parents passed down to his older sister, Mukakayange Veronique. Mukakayange Veronique recalls the loss of their mother in a violent bombing, finding a way to build a relationship through song, and forgiveness. By discussing the manner in which they personally survived hardship, Muyisenge Onaan and Mukakayange Veronique imagine solutions for a peaceful future for Rwanda.

"There is a proverb in Kinyarwanda which says 'A good neighbor is better than a distant relative'." Mukakayange Veronique

Mudenge Leopard & Manzi Erick

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Although Manzi Erick is Mudenge Leopard’s brother, there are many things that he does not know about his sibling’s background. Mudenge Leopard tells his brother about his childhood, how he left home to earn a living, and emphasizes that the most important lesson he learned was to always strive to be on good terms with everyone. Manzi Erick asks important questions about how to get along with all people, including those who do not want to socialize or those from a different generation, and his brother offers advice.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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