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Mukangiruwonsanga Agnes & Ntamitondero Muneza Yves

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Mukangiruwnsanga Agnes talks to Ntamitondero Muneza Yves about the history of his own name because he has been ashamed of it, and how their personal history and Rwandan history have shaped the naming of youths. She also shares her personal story growing up as one of ten children, and counsels Ntamitondero Muneza Yves on how to be a useful and meaningful member of society for a better future, with tips from learning to keep secrets, to developing a culture of peace.

Mukayiranga Verena & Mugisha Gabriel & Sharangabo Jean de Dieu

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Mukayiranga Verena is speaking with two of her adopted sons, Mugisha Gabriel and Sharangabo Jean de Dieu. She tells stories of her struggles with discrimination between the different ethnicities and how there was nothing but love between all Rwandese people before the colonists arrived. Verena shares how she lived in paralyzing fear during the war saying “I could not sleep well; I would think that people would come to kill us.” Despite being traumatized by her experiences she overcame her fear and shares her story with her sons.

Nyirasafari Leocadie & Mukiza Emmanuel

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Mukiza Emmanuel has many questions for his mother, Nyirasafari Leocadie, about her life before and after the war. Nyirasafari Leocadie describes her schooling, marriage, and raising children, and the hardships the family faced while living in exile. Mukiza Emmanuel is also eager to hear stories about his father and the grandfathers he never knew. Nyirasafari Leocadie tells him the lessons she learned from her father.

“During the war, I was then young. I would like to know about life during the war.” Mukiza Emmanuel

Urayeneza Sauda & Mugwaneza Noella

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In the days of Mugwaneza Noella’s grandparents, children remained naked until they were the age of 10, at which point they would be clothed with dressed skin leather. Mugwaneza Noella and her aunt, Urayeneza Sauda, discuss the differences between the past and present culture and how it has affected the youth of today.

“Did your mother never help you or tell your brother to help you? Could your brothers plead for you so that you may go to school?” Mugwaneza Noella

Uwamahoro Ernestine & Uwimana Deogratias

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Uwimana Deogratias is curious about the level of education in Rwanda, and he hopes his elder, Uwamahoro Ernestine, can give him more knowledge on the topic. He was concerned with how uneducated the older generation is, so Uwamahoro Ernestine explains how difficult it was to study during her youth. Comparing the days of her youth when it was rare to see anyone pass their education to today when even those with university degrees may not be guaranteed employment, the times have changed immensely.

Zimulinda Pheneas & Shingiro Remy

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Full of questions concerning the history of religion in Rwanda and how Rwandan culture of the past differs from that of today, Shingiro Remy listens intently to the words of Zimulinda Pheneas, his counselor. Zimulinda Pheneas discusses the origins of churches in Rwanda, the issues of teen pregnancy and drug abuse, how children were traumatized even without going through the genocide, the effect of good parenting and community parenting, and his philosophy on education. He goes into detail on such subjects as rape, gendered violence, and prostitution.

Sebakaka Deó & Muvumyi Olivier

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Looking for guidance on his career and life path, Muvumyi Olivier speaks with his uncle, Sebakaka Deó. His Uncle explains what success meant for his life and how he achieved it both for his career and family. As his uncle shares his stories, Muvumyi Olivier discovers that Sebakaka Deó suffered tremendously on his journey to become the man that he is today. Sebakaka Deó recalls a time of immense heartache as well as strength when “I lost my wife after our wedding. It was such a terrible moment that required me to stand strong, pray hard, and become more patient!”

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Muvunyi Olivier

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Muvunyi Olivier has many questions for his mother, Mukagakwaya Beatrice, about how Rwandan culture has changed since her childhood. Mukagakwaya Beatrice provides descriptions of the courtship rituals in the past, dress and behavior during weddings, and the gender norms that governed women’s lives. She tells her son that women today are not as respectful of traditional cultured or their elders. She advises young people to be peaceful and content with what they have. Muvunyi Olivier welcomes his mother’s story and wonders about these traditions in contemporary society.

Nsabimana Jean Pierre & Zaninka Scola

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Zaninka Scola was born shortly after her father’s death and only got to know her mother for a short time before she died. In this story, her elder brother Nsabimana Jean Pierre shares with her all that she wants to know about their parents: their marriage, their values, their care for them as children. His message to her is partly summed up in a Rwandese proverb that means, ‘no one shall receive what they have not earned.’ He also passes to her the legacy given to him by their father that they must always share what they have with others.

Nyirahabimana Consolee & Mukeshimana Godelive

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Nyirahabimana Consolee tells Mukeshimana Godelive stories about the way young girls acted before she was born, drawing on her own life and the stories her aunts told her. They include everything from weaving, the to difficulties with accepting advice, dealing with mothers-in-law, giving birth, changing traditions about co-wives, and much more.

"I can’t confirm that all the poor take a wrong way which will cause them more pain because of poverty. So even the poor can keep their dignities in their poverty and finally get their own families." Nyirahabimana Consolee

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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