Mukandagijimava Epiphanie & Muhongwanseko Scholastique


Mother and daughter open up to each other about love, loss, and marriage. The two women discuss many topics including religion, intimate relationships, and how dating practices have changed over time. Muhongwanseck Scholastique shares her concerns about her future with her mother Mukandagijimava Epiphanie, and asks about the secret to her parent’s good marriage. Mukandagijimava Epiphanie welcomes her daughter’s questions and says that relationships should be based on love, respect, and communication.

Ntibanyendera Elissam & Muhawenimana Genevieve


As a young woman, Muhawenimana Genevieve has burning questions concerning the way life was in the time of her elders. She invites her uncle to help her answer these questions. The Rwanda of today is far removed from the Rwanda of the past, as Muhawenimana Genevieve discovers. Families and the land they owned used to be large, and money did not even exist. Instead, life depended on one’s resources such as livestock and property. She asks about the shift in norms for boys and girls such as the issue of HIV/AIDS and rebelliousness in today’s youth.

Sebakaka Deó & Muvumyi Olivier


Looking for guidance on his career and life path, Muvumyi Olivier speaks with his uncle, Sebakaka Deó. His Uncle explains what success meant for his life and how he achieved it both for his career and family. As his uncle shares his stories, Muvumyi Olivier discovers that Sebakaka Deó suffered tremendously on his journey to become the man that he is today. Sebakaka Deó recalls a time of immense heartache as well as strength when “I lost my wife after our wedding. It was such a terrible moment that required me to stand strong, pray hard, and become more patient!”

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Muvunyi Olivier


Muvunyi Olivier has many questions for his mother, Mukagakwaya Beatrice, about how Rwandan culture has changed since her childhood. Mukagakwaya Beatrice provides descriptions of the courtship rituals in the past, dress and behavior during weddings, and the gender norms that governed women’s lives. She tells her son that women today are not as respectful of traditional cultured or their elders. She advises young people to be peaceful and content with what they have. Muvunyi Olivier welcomes his mother’s story and wonders about these traditions in contemporary society.

Kantarama Peace & Mukamana Marie Joie


Kantarama Peace’s daughter, Mukamana Marie Joie, is confused about marriage. She asks her mother, a member of a mother’s union who has helped many girls and given them advice, numerous questions. Kantarama Peace emphasizes never to give up when it comes to love, because as long as its for love, anyone can achieve success.

Nyirahabimana Consolee & Mukeshimana Godelive


Nyirahabimana Consolee tells Mukeshimana Godelive stories about the way young girls acted before she was born, drawing on her own life and the stories her aunts told her. They include everything from weaving, the to difficulties with accepting advice, dealing with mothers-in-law, giving birth, changing traditions about co-wives, and much more.

"I can’t confirm that all the poor take a wrong way which will cause them more pain because of poverty. So even the poor can keep their dignities in their poverty and finally get their own families." Nyirahabimana Consolee

Ndiseguye Aloysia & Gatesi Charlotte


Ndiseguye Aloysia helps Gatesi Charlotte understand how to lead a productive and fulfilling life and reminds her to always ask for advice from older people. Ndiseguye Aloysia reminds her that children should be helped and treated with empathy rather than punished, and that being studious is the best way to avoid trouble. Importantly, boys and girls should respect each other and study together to encourage one another.

"To learn how to listen, to respect and to ask for advises, it is very good. If you are advised...you should feel that you are lucky." Ndiseguye Aloysia

Rwihisha Tharcisse & Murorunkwere Janet


Ruhigisha Tharcisse and Murorunkwere Janet have never spoken about his past as a refugee who went from country and country after 1959, living in poverty in refugee camps. He eventually trained himself in a skill and was able to sustained himself. She has many questions for him. Ruhigisha Tharcisse has advice for her about how to sustain herself and has high hopes that she can survive with dignity.

Ingabire Janviere & Umurerwa Divine


Ingabire Janviere wishes to tell her sister Umurerwa Divine about all of the hardships that she has faced in her life. How “life after war became too bad.” Yet despite all of these struggles, she trusted God, found people to help her, and she endured. Umurerwa Divine learned a lot from her sister, and she said that she will continue to pray that God helps her throughout the rest of her life.

Mukantwali Félicita & Rutiganda Rigobert

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Mukantwali Felicita and her son discuss their family’s history; Felicita’s life as a refugee and orphan, and how lucky Rutiganda Rigobert is to have an emerging and improving Rwanda in his future. Together they discuss how Rutiganda Rigobert can become a part of a new generation that prizes education, learns from the Rwanda’s past, and moves Rwanda forward in education, culture and health. Their conversation touches on a variety of subjects ranging from the causes of the genocide to relationship advice.


SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here


OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“

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