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Urayeneza Sauda & Mugwaneza Noella

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In the days of Mugwaneza Noella’s grandparents, children remained naked until they were the age of 10, at which point they would be clothed with dressed skin leather. Mugwaneza Noella and her aunt, Urayeneza Sauda, discuss the differences between the past and present culture and how it has affected the youth of today.

“Did your mother never help you or tell your brother to help you? Could your brothers plead for you so that you may go to school?” Mugwaneza Noella

“As I told you, it was the culture and for my mother she would like to help me so that I may rest but that’s how the culture was. They thought that girls would do all house works, not boys. Boys had to play but girls had to work and I did it gladly because it was the culture.” Urayeneza Sauda

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ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

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