Munganyinka Melaine & Murebwayire Marie Claire


Munganyinka Melaine lived in a time when girls were restricted to house duties, no education, and general strictness which boys were not subject to. Girls would stay home and make butter, weave, and take care of kids. Women could have fun too, but it all took place within the strict confines of the old Rwandan culture and way of life.

Urayeneza Sauda & Mugwaneza Noella


In the days of Mugwaneza Noella’s grandparents, children remained naked until they were the age of 10, at which point they would be clothed with dressed skin leather. Mugwaneza Noella and her aunt, Urayeneza Sauda, discuss the differences between the past and present culture and how it has affected the youth of today.

“Did your mother never help you or tell your brother to help you? Could your brothers plead for you so that you may go to school?” Mugwaneza Noella

Uwamahoro Ernestine & Uwimana Deogratias


Uwimana Deogratias is curious about the level of education in Rwanda, and he hopes his elder, Uwamahoro Ernestine, can give him more knowledge on the topic. He was concerned with how uneducated the older generation is, so Uwamahoro Ernestine explains how difficult it was to study during her youth. Comparing the days of her youth when it was rare to see anyone pass their education to today when even those with university degrees may not be guaranteed employment, the times have changed immensely.

Ntibanyendera Elissam & Muhawenimana Genevieve


As a young woman, Muhawenimana Genevieve has burning questions concerning the way life was in the time of her elders. She invites her uncle to help her answer these questions. The Rwanda of today is far removed from the Rwanda of the past, as Muhawenimana Genevieve discovers. Families and the land they owned used to be large, and money did not even exist. Instead, life depended on one’s resources such as livestock and property. She asks about the shift in norms for boys and girls such as the issue of HIV/AIDS and rebelliousness in today’s youth.

Zimulinda Pheneas & Shingiro Remy


Full of questions concerning the history of religion in Rwanda and how Rwandan culture of the past differs from that of today, Shingiro Remy listens intently to the words of Zimulinda Pheneas, his counselor. Zimulinda Pheneas discusses the origins of churches in Rwanda, the issues of teen pregnancy and drug abuse, how children were traumatized even without going through the genocide, the effect of good parenting and community parenting, and his philosophy on education. He goes into detail on such subjects as rape, gendered violence, and prostitution.

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Muvunyi Olivier


Muvunyi Olivier has many questions for his mother, Mukagakwaya Beatrice, about how Rwandan culture has changed since her childhood. Mukagakwaya Beatrice provides descriptions of the courtship rituals in the past, dress and behavior during weddings, and the gender norms that governed women’s lives. She tells her son that women today are not as respectful of traditional cultured or their elders. She advises young people to be peaceful and content with what they have. Muvunyi Olivier welcomes his mother’s story and wonders about these traditions in contemporary society.

Kantarama Peace & Mukamana Marie Joie


Kantarama Peace’s daughter, Mukamana Marie Joie, is confused about marriage. She asks her mother, a member of a mother’s union who has helped many girls and given them advice, numerous questions. Kantarama Peace emphasizes never to give up when it comes to love, because as long as its for love, anyone can achieve success.

Ndiseguye Aloysia & Gatesi Charlotte


Ndiseguye Aloysia helps Gatesi Charlotte understand how to lead a productive and fulfilling life and reminds her to always ask for advice from older people. Ndiseguye Aloysia reminds her that children should be helped and treated with empathy rather than punished, and that being studious is the best way to avoid trouble. Importantly, boys and girls should respect each other and study together to encourage one another.

"To learn how to listen, to respect and to ask for advises, it is very good. If you are advised...you should feel that you are lucky." Ndiseguye Aloysia

Kabandana Louis & Nkusi Faustin


Kabandana Louis and Nkusi Faustin have different reasons to explain why elders and youths no longer share stories, histories, and proverbs. Yet they also discover both sides might be much more willing to talk than they thought. They discuss the growing equality for women and how important it is to remember the past even if new ways might be better. Kabandana Louis talks of female soldiers, folklore fears, and the impact technology has on Rwandese oral culture.

Pastor Ruhagararabahurga Eric & Munganyinka Daima Lydia


Pastor Ruhagararabahurg Eric describes to Munganyinka Daima Lydia how he made a fulfilling life for himself. After joining the army and fighting to protect the President, Pastor Eric realized that his true passion lies with protecting and helping others. He then became a man of God and devoted his life to helping street children find a better life in Rwanda. He describes to Daima Lydia how this journey toward faith allowed him to realize the significance of faith in reconciliation for Rwanda; forgiveness must be coupled with repentance in order to begin the healing.


SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here


OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“

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