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Kamanzi Jean Baptiste & Ngango Jean Bosco

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Kamanzi Jean Baptiste tells the story of his life's hardships to his younger brother, Ngango Jean Bosco, who has not lived through such times as he has. Kamanzi Jean Baptiste shares with his brother details about his life such as how he joined the army because of abuse and hunger at home, or how he became handicapped and still decided to go to school at the age of 22 with peers who were 12 years old. Ngango Jean Bosco listens to his brother’s words and continues to ask more questions to which Kamanzi Jean Baptiste is happy to answer.

Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Mukankubana Rose & Kwizera Jean Pierre

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Mukankubana Rose tells her son about finding strength as an orphan, as a widow, and as a mother, and the secret to raising children in difficult times. Kwizera Jean Pierre is curious about the influence of their older family members, the hardest decision she had to make between education and the love she had for her family, and a book written by his uncle.

Habineza Pascal & Mwubahamana Shalon

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Growing up as an orphan, Mwubahamana Shalon is curious about the life of other orphans and asks her uncle, Habineza Pascal, about how they live. She carefully listens to Habineza Pascal’s numerous experiences with taking care of orphans, as well as his advice. The story is full with Habineza Pascal’s aspirations for his niece and other orphans; to “do good things so that people around you will never see you in that image of being hopeless."

Umamwezi Philomene & Masengesho Rosine

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Both Masengesho Rosine and her grandmother have experienced the hardships that women faced, the genocide, and life as orphans. But have never before spoken to one another about their lives. Umamwezi Philomene acknowledges the hurt and suffering women in particular have struggled with in Rwandan history, but sees a bright future for Masengesho Rosine through her youth and educational opportunities. Most importantly, she reminds her that all Rwandans should stand together for justice and peace, and being an orphan does not mean you cannot find a parent to advise you in times of need.

Umazikungu Beatrice & Gashumba Yves Fabrice

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Although Gashumba Yves Fabrice and longs for a peaceful future, he still has a hard time forgiving those involved in the genocide and fears the resurgence of conflict. His friend Umazikungu Beatrice reminds him that kindness toward everyone is the best way to prove that Rwanda can move forward, and it is better to be remembered for acts of kindness rather than the brief satisfaction of taking revenge and being remembered for evil.

Rwamucyo Denys & Hadasa Esther

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Hadasa Esther respects her uncle, Rwamucyo Denys, and wants to know his life history. Rwamucyo Denys tells her about the identity cards that they were forced to carry before the war and how his family fled to Burundi to escape violence. Hadasa Esther asks her uncle many questions about the nature of ethnic discrimination and he reminds her that “All of us are Rwandese” and should be united. Despite the many hardships Rwamucyo Denys has been through, he wants his niece to stay positive and always concentrate on doing what is right.

Mudenge Leopard & Manzi Erick

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Although Manzi Erick is Mudenge Leopard’s brother, there are many things that he does not know about his sibling’s background. Mudenge Leopard tells his brother about his childhood, how he left home to earn a living, and emphasizes that the most important lesson he learned was to always strive to be on good terms with everyone. Manzi Erick asks important questions about how to get along with all people, including those who do not want to socialize or those from a different generation, and his brother offers advice.

Ingabire Janviere & Umurerwa Divine

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Ingabire Janviere wishes to tell her sister Umurerwa Divine about all of the hardships that she has faced in her life. How “life after war became too bad.” Yet despite all of these struggles, she trusted God, found people to help her, and she endured. Umurerwa Divine learned a lot from her sister, and she said that she will continue to pray that God helps her throughout the rest of her life.

Musabyimana Epiphanie & Hakizimana Justin

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Hakizimana Justin and Musabyimana Epiphanie are siblings who lost their parents during the genocide. Since Hakizimana Justin was very young at the time, he wants his older sister to tell him about their family, ethnic discrimination, and the many hardships that she went through after the genocide. Since he has no other adult to turn to, Hakizimana Justin also asks Musayimana Epiphanie for advice about how he should behave in different settings. As any good older sister would do, she advises him on the proper way to live his life.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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