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Exile

Nyirasafari Leocadie & Mukiza Emmanuel

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Mukiza Emmanuel has many questions for his mother, Nyirasafari Leocadie, about her life before and after the war. Nyirasafari Leocadie describes her schooling, marriage, and raising children, and the hardships the family faced while living in exile. Mukiza Emmanuel is also eager to hear stories about his father and the grandfathers he never knew. Nyirasafari Leocadie tells him the lessons she learned from her father.

“During the war, I was then young. I would like to know about life during the war.” Mukiza Emmanuel

Rwamucyo Denys & Hadasa Esther

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Hadasa Esther respects her uncle, Rwamucyo Denys, and wants to know his life history. Rwamucyo Denys tells her about the identity cards that they were forced to carry before the war and how his family fled to Burundi to escape violence. Hadasa Esther asks her uncle many questions about the nature of ethnic discrimination and he reminds her that “All of us are Rwandese” and should be united. Despite the many hardships Rwamucyo Denys has been through, he wants his niece to stay positive and always concentrate on doing what is right.

Gasani Gerarid & Rukiriza Antoine

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Rukiriza Antoine wants to join the army, so he decides to ask his father, Gasani Gerarid, about his own military service. Gasani Gerarid joined the Burundian army after he fled Rwanda during the 1970’s. He says that it was a very good experience, so he supports his son’s decision to fight for his country. However, Gasani Gerarid also stresses the importance of working hard and supporting a family. Even if Rukiriza Antoine is unable to join the army, his father says that he must find a way to use his skills to make a living.

Gahizi Valgas & Nyinawintore Marlaine

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Gahizi Valgas begins his story by telling his niece, Nyinawintore Marlaine, about the first time that he realized that he was a refugee. He describes the hardships that he and his family went through because they were not welcomed. He encourages his niece to continue her schooling, because in the past not everyone was given the right to education. He hopes that Nyinawintore Marlaine will fight against anything that could cause another genocide, because he does not want Rwandese to be forced to live as refugees again.

Ingabire Pascaline & Umuhoza Fanny

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Umuhoza Fanny asks her mother, Ingabire Pascaline, many of the questions she's wondered about for years: what country were you born in, how did you meet your husband, what was life as a refugee like, and many more. Ingabire Pascaline answers her daughter's questions and explains their family's history. She also tells Umuhoza Fanny how lucky she is to have grown up with a mother. Ingabire Pascaline describes how hard her father worked to provide for his children, how the loss of her mother at a young age affected her life, and why she credits patience for her success today.

Mukakarangwa Sarah & Ntamigemo Elias

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Living in exile, Mukakarangwa Sarah was 15 when she was obligated to get married to a 28 year-old. After returning to Rwanda, Sarah found that her native country faced serious threats to its security and stability like ethnic political groups and divided ethnic populations. Sarah's life was further complicated by her in-laws' attempts to force her husband to remarry within his ethnic group and later her husband's death just weeks before Ntamigemo Elias' birth. Having survived the genocide she relies on her love for her children and her hopes for unity and reconciliation to keep her going.

Karangwa Emmanuel & Ndahiro Jean Marie Vianney

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Vianney snuck out of Rwanda to Burundi by crawling through forest surrounded by an army. He had a plan to join the forces that were fighting the genocide. When he got to Burundi, he forgot this plan and spent his time replenishing with food that had been donated to the refugee camp where he lived. He got his wakeup call when he was visited by a man he would never forget. The legacy he hopes to leave with his brother is that of a nation that rebuilds its cultural institutions and relies on its youth to think like heroes.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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