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Gahizi Valgas & Nyinawintore Marlaine

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Gahizi Valgas begins his story by telling his niece, Nyinawintore Marlaine, about the first time that he realized that he was a refugee. He describes the hardships that he and his family went through because they were not welcomed. He encourages his niece to continue her schooling, because in the past not everyone was given the right to education. He hopes that Nyinawintore Marlaine will fight against anything that could cause another genocide, because he does not want Rwandese to be forced to live as refugees again.

Mukantwali Félicita & Rutiganda Rigobert

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Mukantwali Felicita and her son discuss their family’s history; Felicita’s life as a refugee and orphan, and how lucky Rutiganda Rigobert is to have an emerging and improving Rwanda in his future. Together they discuss how Rutiganda Rigobert can become a part of a new generation that prizes education, learns from the Rwanda’s past, and moves Rwanda forward in education, culture and health. Their conversation touches on a variety of subjects ranging from the causes of the genocide to relationship advice.

Mukamudenge Angela & Ndarihoranye Gaston

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Mukamudenge Angela describes her parents' lifestyle to her son: how they farmed, how they told stories, and how that life has changed in her son's lifetime. Her stories illustrate a simpler life; her parents relied on their hands rather than books to do their work, and children could always find guidance from the elders sitting around the fireplace. Mukamudenge Angela hopes that her stories and a better understanding of previous generations will lead her son to both appreciate the benefits of a changing Rwanda, and learn from his family's past.

Nyirasamaza Anunciata & Byiringiro Alexis

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Nyirasamaza Anunciata and Byiringiro Alexis discuss their family's history, including why Byiringiro Alexis has never met his father, how Nyirasamaza Anunciata met her first and second husband, and what it has meant for both of them that she was widowed. Their loss as a family because of the 1994 genocide and the effects it has had come to the forefront and are openly discussed between mother and son. Byiringiro Alexis admits that he struggles seeing the purpose of continuing his education and asks his mother why he has faced such difficulties in his life.

Niyiguba Emmanuel & Rugira Jean Rene

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Older brother Niyiguba Emmanuel explains in great detail the genocide that resulted in the brothers' loss of several siblings and one parent. Rugira Jean Rene recounts to his brother the details of the genocide and ethnic discrimination that he is familiar with and Niyiguba Emmanuel elaborates on these facts with more details and additional information, helping his younger brother to understand his country's and family's history better.

Mukagatare Laetitia & Uwihoreye Seraphine

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Uwihoreye Seraphine asks her aunt, Mukagatare Laetitia for advice on dating, intimate relationships, and the meaning of personal faith. Mukagatare Laetitia talks about her own adolescence and stresses the importance of women obtaining an education before they start worrying about men. Aunt and niece discuss Rwandan gender norms and Uwihoreye Seraphine learns how to protect herself in future relationships.

Mukakayonde Anna & Nyiranzeyimana Solange

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Nyiranzeyimana Solange comes to storytelling discontented about her life, wondering why she was left alone. Because she is young, she only knows the life she has right now, and cannot compare it to any other life, like the one during the genocide, and before. Could there have been a better life than this one, she asks her elder? Mukakayonde Anna works very hard to convince Nyiranzeyimana Solange that right now life is much better than before. In the same breath that she tells Nyiranzeyimana Solange that her relatives died in the genocide, she tries to bring hope.

Kabatesi Donatha & Kabatesi Binta Samantha

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Binta Samantha asks her aunt, Kabalesi Donatha, to tell the story of her life so far. She learns that, while the aunt’s parents loved her, they could not easily support her love for school. So she married, but the marriage was difficult and ended, while health problems followed. But Kabalesi Donatha found that her faith was a great source of guidance to her, and she wishes to pass on this to her niece. Binta Samantha puts her dilemmas squarely to her aunt—that the life of a young person is full of temptations, especially when the yearning in Rwanda is so much for life!

Mukarurangwa Judith & Karangwa Nadia

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Stories For Hope created a forum for elders to inspire the youth; at least that’s what Mukakarangwa Judith and Karangwa Nadia expected when they accepted to share their story. In this story however, the roles reversed as an elder found encouragement and inspiration from her niece and adopted child who tries to point out how children now play together in Rwanda, even as their own parents were once enemies.

“I think that my child’s view has challenged even me.” Mukakarangwa Judith

Nyinawabagesera Amandine & Uwimana Jean Claude

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Nyinawabagesera Amandine wants to share some of her life stories, both good and bad, with her friend Uwimana Jean Claude so that he can learn from her example. After being orphaned by the genocide, Nyinawabagesera Amandine risked going to school without supplies. There, she overcame many challenges associated with depression, drugs, and alcohol through the support of friends and her faith. Nyinawabagesera Amandine says she is inspired by the people around her and resolves to help other orphans like herself who have almost lost all hope.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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