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Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Mukankubana Rose & Kwizera Jean Pierre

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Mukankubana Rose tells her son about finding strength as an orphan, as a widow, and as a mother, and the secret to raising children in difficult times. Kwizera Jean Pierre is curious about the influence of their older family members, the hardest decision she had to make between education and the love she had for her family, and a book written by his uncle.

Habumukiza Bernard & Mujyanama Eric

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Habumukiza Bernard talks to his student, Mujyanama Eric, about the importance of education and his decision to become a teacher, reminding him that the most important aspect of employment isn't always how much money you make.

"When you are at school you have to be united, to know that you are all students from the same
school, you are all Rwandans; you are all young and consider yourself as twins who have the
same mother." Habumukiza Bernard

"What is the secret of doing the same job for a long time?" Mujyanama Eric

Twahirwa Deborah & Tuyishimire Florence

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When a large number of children were orphaned by the genocide, it became difficult for many of them to find people to replace their families and get advice from. Twahirwa Deborah tells Tuyishimire Florence the ways orphans can see love and comfort in the world so they can hope for a brighter future, and how all Rwandans must forget about their differences and become one family.

Ndiseguye Aloysia & Gatesi Charlotte

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Ndiseguye Aloysia helps Gatesi Charlotte understand how to lead a productive and fulfilling life and reminds her to always ask for advice from older people. Ndiseguye Aloysia reminds her that children should be helped and treated with empathy rather than punished, and that being studious is the best way to avoid trouble. Importantly, boys and girls should respect each other and study together to encourage one another.

"To learn how to listen, to respect and to ask for advises, it is very good. If you are advised...you should feel that you are lucky." Ndiseguye Aloysia

Umamwezi Philomene & Masengesho Rosine

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Both Masengesho Rosine and her grandmother have experienced the hardships that women faced, the genocide, and life as orphans. But have never before spoken to one another about their lives. Umamwezi Philomene acknowledges the hurt and suffering women in particular have struggled with in Rwandan history, but sees a bright future for Masengesho Rosine through her youth and educational opportunities. Most importantly, she reminds her that all Rwandans should stand together for justice and peace, and being an orphan does not mean you cannot find a parent to advise you in times of need.

Nyirangendahimana Consolate & Muhire Noel

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Muhire Noel wishes to know everything about the family members he was never able to meet, especially his great grandparents, and Nyirangendahimana Consolate tells him stories about each person. Nyirangendahimana Consolate shares a family history that includes her father's love of listening to prayer, lighting her grandfather's cigarettes, and drawing strength from her mother. She also reminds Muhire Noel that the most important thing is to learn to be calm, overcome conflict, and always believe the future is bright.

Mujawiyera Josephine & Habineza Fidei

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Habineza Fidei seeks the advice of his adoptive mother about how to plan a family, negotiate difficult situations with his new wife, and preserve important traditions in a changing world. Mujawiyera Josephine remembers being the most beloved of her father's children, and describes the neglect her siblings suffered as the family increased in size. She counsels her son only to have as many children as he can love fully and support financially.

Rwamucyo Denys & Hadasa Esther

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Hadasa Esther respects her uncle, Rwamucyo Denys, and wants to know his life history. Rwamucyo Denys tells her about the identity cards that they were forced to carry before the war and how his family fled to Burundi to escape violence. Hadasa Esther asks her uncle many questions about the nature of ethnic discrimination and he reminds her that “All of us are Rwandese” and should be united. Despite the many hardships Rwamucyo Denys has been through, he wants his niece to stay positive and always concentrate on doing what is right.

Ingabire Janviere & Umurerwa Divine

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Ingabire Janviere wishes to tell her sister Umurerwa Divine about all of the hardships that she has faced in her life. How “life after war became too bad.” Yet despite all of these struggles, she trusted God, found people to help her, and she endured. Umurerwa Divine learned a lot from her sister, and she said that she will continue to pray that God helps her throughout the rest of her life.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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