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Genocidal Loss

Mukangarambe Pascasie & Gahigi Jean Pierre

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Mukangarambe Pascasie wants her son to know his maternal family history, since he knows little about her life as a young girl, and why her marriage to Gahigi Jean Pierre's father did not work out well. She describes that the difficulties for young girls right after the genocide, their need for protection and love after terrible times, led many into hasty marriages. Her father was a hero to her before he died, “a loyal creative man” who was determined to give them a good future, the best he could.

Musabyimana Epiphanie & Hakizimana Justin

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Hakizimana Justin and Musabyimana Epiphanie are siblings who lost their parents during the genocide. Since Hakizimana Justin was very young at the time, he wants his older sister to tell him about their family, ethnic discrimination, and the many hardships that she went through after the genocide. Since he has no other adult to turn to, Hakizimana Justin also asks Musayimana Epiphanie for advice about how he should behave in different settings. As any good older sister would do, she advises him on the proper way to live his life.

Tabaruka Jeannine & Unnultoza Christine

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Tabaruka Jeannine and Unnultoza Christine discuss the reason that Unnultoza Christine grew up without her father and brother. Unnultoza Christine has several questions surrounding their deaths during the genocide. Tabaruka Jeannine does her best to answer these questions so that her daughter may understand her family's history, but more importantly so she can move past the harsh realities of Rwanda's past and begin planning her future. Tabaruka Jeannine relates her past to help Unnultoza Christine realize that she is not alone in her struggles and that they are surmountable.

Musabyimouna Edith & Lemurunyai Sandrine

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Musabyimouna Edith tells her daughter how she went from being a lazy, spoiled daughter, to a hardworking survivor and mother. She describes how she was able to survive the genocide partially through her own willingness to change, but largely through the benevolence of strangers who were willing to hide, clothe and feed her during the violence. In order to survive, Musabyimouna Edith relied on strangers to conceal her identity and endured several close encounters with potentially violent individuals.

Mukansanze Imfura Chantal & Turatsinze Jimmy

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Mukansanze Imfura Chantal explains to Turatsinze Jimmy how he became an orphan and how he got to where he is today. She urges him to continue his education and, equally importantly, to treat everyone as equals, regardless of ethnicity, wealth, or status, not only for himself, but for the future of the country. Turatsinze Jimmy describes his hazy memories as a young boy about the origins of genocide—why did a plane crash start a war? Was there already a plan in place to start the killing? Has there always been a rift between ethnicities?

Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney & Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose

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Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney and his daughter Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose use this opportunity to discuss the origins and causes of the 1994 genocide on both personal and national levels. Sakindi Jean Marie describes to Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose how close he and his wife came to death and what life was like in the years leading up to the genocide. They hid in closets, relied on the kindness of their neighbors, and turned to faith to keep them hopeful and lead them to forgiveness. Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose details how she and her classmates try to prevent conflict in their country.

Murekatete Justine & Tuyiseuge Claudette

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Two sisters orphaned by genocide, Murekatete Justine and Tuyiseuge Claudette, discuss how they can recover from the trauma they endured. Tuyiseuge Claudette tells her sister of the trouble she has remaining motivated to stay in school and continue working for her future. Murekatete Justine responds with her own inspirational story about raising two children and her sister singlehandedly.

Nyirasamaza Anunciata & Byiringiro Alexis

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Nyirasamaza Anunciata and Byiringiro Alexis discuss their family's history, including why Byiringiro Alexis has never met his father, how Nyirasamaza Anunciata met her first and second husband, and what it has meant for both of them that she was widowed. Their loss as a family because of the 1994 genocide and the effects it has had come to the forefront and are openly discussed between mother and son. Byiringiro Alexis admits that he struggles seeing the purpose of continuing his education and asks his mother why he has faced such difficulties in his life.

Niyonteze Olive & Uwamurera Yvone

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Uwamurera Yvone asks her step-sister, Niyonteze Olive, to tell her about their family’s past. How did their father die in the genocide and how Uwamurera Yvone’s mother was left without inheritance. How Niyonteze Olive worked as a domestic worker, preserved herself, and was able to improve her life. Uwamurera Yvone wants to know how the family will take care of her in the future. Niyonteze Olive reminds her of the support that exists from her grandmother and other relatives, and advises her to be patient.

Bankundiye Albertine & Nyinawumuntu Violette

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With a focus on the importance of kindness and acceptance, Bankundiye Albertine tells her friend Nyinawumuntu Violette about her family’s past. She talks about her father, an educated man who was killed in the genocide, who would take children off the streets and help them get into schools. His good deeds and reputation inform Bankundiye Albertine’s actions and continue to keep her safe. She also mentions her challenges with her mother’s side of the family. Nyinawumuntu Violette offers consolation and advises Bankundiye Albertine to be loving towards her family and they will love her back.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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