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Independence & Military rule (1959-1994)

Bubanje Rosalie & Rudasingwa Lorette

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Rudasingwa Lorette and her mother, Bubanje Rosalie, discuss the secrets to a successful marriage. Rudasingwa Lorette has recently gotten married and admires her parents' marriage and asks her mother how she can recreate the success they have had in remaining together. Bubanje Rosalie offers her advice about keeping a happy household through mutual respect between spouses and similar expectations in marriage.

Mwumvaneza Vincent & Tambo Nelson

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Tambo Nelson and his older brother Mwumvaneza Vincent discuss the colonial origins of the ethnic divide between Hutu and Tutsi. Mwumvaneza Vincent explains how, prior to colonialism, Rwanda was divided by wealth and status, not ethnicity, but the presence of colonial settlers and their institutions codified these differences and lead to ethnically divided political parties. Mwumvaneza Vincent wants Tambo Nelson to understand how violence and "genocide ideology" became present in Rwanda as a result of ethnic discrimination in education, work opportunities, and political rights.

Mukamana Theopista & Umuvandimwe Marie Claire

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Umuvandimwe Marie Claire looks up to Mukamana Theopista, and wants to hear about her friend's past in order to learn from her. When asked about what “was your happiest moment and what was your saddest moment,” Mukamana Theopista discusses growing up in poverty and moving through many tragedies into a positive present. She thanks God and her loving husband for supporting her through house fires, illness, and lost children. She encourages Umuvandimwe Marie Claire to be thankful for what she has and to have faith that she will have a good partner and strong marriage.

Mukakarangwa Sarah & Ntamigemo Elias

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Living in exile, Mukakarangwa Sarah was 15 when she was obligated to get married to a 28 year-old. After returning to Rwanda, Sarah found that her native country faced serious threats to its security and stability like ethnic political groups and divided ethnic populations. Sarah's life was further complicated by her in-laws' attempts to force her husband to remarry within his ethnic group and later her husband's death just weeks before Ntamigemo Elias' birth. Having survived the genocide she relies on her love for her children and her hopes for unity and reconciliation to keep her going.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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