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Sebakaka Deó & Muvumyi Olivier

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Looking for guidance on his career and life path, Muvumyi Olivier speaks with his uncle, Sebakaka Deó. His Uncle explains what success meant for his life and how he achieved it both for his career and family. As his uncle shares his stories, Muvumyi Olivier discovers that Sebakaka Deó suffered tremendously on his journey to become the man that he is today. Sebakaka Deó recalls a time of immense heartache as well as strength when “I lost my wife after our wedding. It was such a terrible moment that required me to stand strong, pray hard, and become more patient!”

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Muvunyi Olivier

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Muvunyi Olivier has many questions for his mother, Mukagakwaya Beatrice, about how Rwandan culture has changed since her childhood. Mukagakwaya Beatrice provides descriptions of the courtship rituals in the past, dress and behavior during weddings, and the gender norms that governed women’s lives. She tells her son that women today are not as respectful of traditional cultured or their elders. She advises young people to be peaceful and content with what they have. Muvunyi Olivier welcomes his mother’s story and wonders about these traditions in contemporary society.

Kantarama Peace & Mukamana Marie Joie

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Kantarama Peace’s daughter, Mukamana Marie Joie, is confused about marriage. She asks her mother, a member of a mother’s union who has helped many girls and given them advice, numerous questions. Kantarama Peace emphasizes never to give up when it comes to love, because as long as its for love, anyone can achieve success.

Wherny Namara & Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

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Through conversation, Consolatrice is able to find peace and strengthen her relationship with members of the community. Wherny helps her understand that hatred will not be helpful for the future of Rwanda.

"I developed a sense of love, the love of my enemies. I felt like I'm obliged, I felt like I have to pray for even those who hate me according to the story we shared." Uwizeyimana Consolatrice

Mashavu John Baptist & Kaneza Benoit

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Nyirahabimana Consolee & Mukeshimana Godelive

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Nyirahabimana Consolee tells Mukeshimana Godelive stories about the way young girls acted before she was born, drawing on her own life and the stories her aunts told her. They include everything from weaving, the to difficulties with accepting advice, dealing with mothers-in-law, giving birth, changing traditions about co-wives, and much more.

"I can’t confirm that all the poor take a wrong way which will cause them more pain because of poverty. So even the poor can keep their dignities in their poverty and finally get their own families." Nyirahabimana Consolee

Uwamariya Victoire & Kabuto Noah

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Kabuto Noah is curious about the trauma he witnesses in children who are not old enough to remember or have experienced the genocide, but have been affected by it nonetheless. Uwamariya Victoire tells him about the ways the genocide changed how lives are experienced, complicating everything from family structure to education. Most importantly, Kabuto Noah and Uwamariya Victoire discuss the ways that fear, anger, and sadness are best handled.

Mukankubana Rose & Kwizera Jean Pierre

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Mukankubana Rose tells her son about finding strength as an orphan, as a widow, and as a mother, and the secret to raising children in difficult times. Kwizera Jean Pierre is curious about the influence of their older family members, the hardest decision she had to make between education and the love she had for her family, and a book written by his uncle.

Habumukiza Bernard & Mujyanama Eric

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Habumukiza Bernard talks to his student, Mujyanama Eric, about the importance of education and his decision to become a teacher, reminding him that the most important aspect of employment isn't always how much money you make.

"When you are at school you have to be united, to know that you are all students from the same
school, you are all Rwandans; you are all young and consider yourself as twins who have the
same mother." Habumukiza Bernard

"What is the secret of doing the same job for a long time?" Mujyanama Eric

Nsengimana Jean Paul & Hitimana Jean de Dieu

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Nsengimana Jean Paul has changed his religion as an older man, but recalls the old prayers and rituals from when he was younger. He explains to Hitimana Jean de Dieu about witch doctors, night dancers, and how to properly please the gods for good fortune, and describes his encounters with devils that made him turn to the gospel.

"You pray to the God you know, you understand, and in good order. It is clear that if you ask you will receive, if you knock the door they will open for you, if you look for you will get." Nsengimana Jean Paul

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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