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Umamwezi Philomene & Masengesho Rosine

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Both Masengesho Rosine and her grandmother have experienced the hardships that women faced, the genocide, and life as orphans. But have never before spoken to one another about their lives. Umamwezi Philomene acknowledges the hurt and suffering women in particular have struggled with in Rwandan history, but sees a bright future for Masengesho Rosine through her youth and educational opportunities. Most importantly, she reminds her that all Rwandans should stand together for justice and peace, and being an orphan does not mean you cannot find a parent to advise you in times of need.

Mukagakwaya Beatrice & Murindahabi Canisius

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Murindahabi Canisius's father died when he was too young to know him well, so he asks his sister Mukagakwaya Beatrice to share stories about their father, grandfather, and the ways in which they affected her life. Mukagakwaya Beatrice talks of her father hiding refugees in their home, the strength he inspired her with to survive as a widow, and even how he managed his farm and his favorite foods.

Umazikungu Beatrice & Gashumba Yves Fabrice

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Although Gashumba Yves Fabrice and longs for a peaceful future, he still has a hard time forgiving those involved in the genocide and fears the resurgence of conflict. His friend Umazikungu Beatrice reminds him that kindness toward everyone is the best way to prove that Rwanda can move forward, and it is better to be remembered for acts of kindness rather than the brief satisfaction of taking revenge and being remembered for evil.

Nyirangendahimana Consolate & Muhire Noel

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Muhire Noel wishes to know everything about the family members he was never able to meet, especially his great grandparents, and Nyirangendahimana Consolate tells him stories about each person. Nyirangendahimana Consolate shares a family history that includes her father's love of listening to prayer, lighting her grandfather's cigarettes, and drawing strength from her mother. She also reminds Muhire Noel that the most important thing is to learn to be calm, overcome conflict, and always believe the future is bright.

Niyonteze Olive & Uwamurera Yvone

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Uwamurera Yvone asks her step-sister, Niyonteze Olive, to tell her about their family’s past. How did their father die in the genocide and how Uwamurera Yvone’s mother was left without inheritance. How Niyonteze Olive worked as a domestic worker, preserved herself, and was able to improve her life. Uwamurera Yvone wants to know how the family will take care of her in the future. Niyonteze Olive reminds her of the support that exists from her grandmother and other relatives, and advises her to be patient.

Mukagatare Laetitia & Uwihoreye Seraphine

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Uwihoreye Seraphine asks her aunt, Mukagatare Laetitia for advice on dating, intimate relationships, and the meaning of personal faith. Mukagatare Laetitia talks about her own adolescence and stresses the importance of women obtaining an education before they start worrying about men. Aunt and niece discuss Rwandan gender norms and Uwihoreye Seraphine learns how to protect herself in future relationships.

Murekatete Adrie & Umuhoza Alexie

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Murekatete Adrie, Umuhoza Alexie’s aunt, wants to tell her niece about a former classmate who was orphaned in the genocide. Although lucky enough to be adopted and be given an education, she got in trouble at university by becoming involved with a young man who left her after she became pregnant by him. She wants to warn Umuhoza Alexie to avoid temptations and concentrate on her studies. “I am sure you cannot suffer when you have education.”

Habineza Pascal & Irakarama Joselyne

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Irakarama Joselyne’s uncle, Habineza Pascal, is passionate about the value of a cow, and enthusiastically answers all of her questions regarding this Rwandan culture. Although she already understands the benefits of a cow, she does not fully understand the value of a cow. Irakarama Joselyne wants to know the reason why dowry is almost always done with a certain number of cows, and her uncle explains the significance of this transaction. He even touches upon an example of a government program called “one cow per family,” a system that helps fight poverty and malnutrition.

Bisangwa Simon & Kubwimana Jean d'Amour

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Kubwimana Jean d’Amour would rather listen to history from his father than read it in a history book “written by Frenchmen.” In this interview, he listens to Bisangwa Simon’s personal history for the first time, an experience that both men find beneficial. Bisangwa Simon has had a chaotic life; a high school dropout, he lived through several wars, overcame addiction to alcohol and drugs, and survived a curse. He tells his son how their family survived the genocide by supporting each other in hiding.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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