Home

Family history

Mukakayange Veronique & Muyisenge Onaan

SFH0107.png

Muyisenge Onaan wants to learn about his family history and the stories his parents passed down to his older sister, Mukakayange Veronique. Mukakayange Veronique recalls the loss of their mother in a violent bombing, finding a way to build a relationship through song, and forgiveness. By discussing the manner in which they personally survived hardship, Muyisenge Onaan and Mukakayange Veronique imagine solutions for a peaceful future for Rwanda.

"There is a proverb in Kinyarwanda which says 'A good neighbor is better than a distant relative'." Mukakayange Veronique

Mukangarambe Pascasie & Gahigi Jean Pierre

RE-Re-sized SFH0090.jpg

Mukangarambe Pascasie wants her son to know his maternal family history, since he knows little about her life as a young girl, and why her marriage to Gahigi Jean Pierre's father did not work out well. She describes that the difficulties for young girls right after the genocide, their need for protection and love after terrible times, led many into hasty marriages. Her father was a hero to her before he died, “a loyal creative man” who was determined to give them a good future, the best he could.

Rwamucyo Denys & Hadasa Esther

IMG_2270.jpg

Hadasa Esther respects her uncle, Rwamucyo Denys, and wants to know his life history. Rwamucyo Denys tells her about the identity cards that they were forced to carry before the war and how his family fled to Burundi to escape violence. Hadasa Esther asks her uncle many questions about the nature of ethnic discrimination and he reminds her that “All of us are Rwandese” and should be united. Despite the many hardships Rwamucyo Denys has been through, he wants his niece to stay positive and always concentrate on doing what is right.

Mudenge Leopard & Manzi Erick

CIMG0192.jpg

Although Manzi Erick is Mudenge Leopard’s brother, there are many things that he does not know about his sibling’s background. Mudenge Leopard tells his brother about his childhood, how he left home to earn a living, and emphasizes that the most important lesson he learned was to always strive to be on good terms with everyone. Manzi Erick asks important questions about how to get along with all people, including those who do not want to socialize or those from a different generation, and his brother offers advice.

Musabyimana Epiphanie & Hakizimana Justin

IMG_2270.jpg

Hakizimana Justin and Musabyimana Epiphanie are siblings who lost their parents during the genocide. Since Hakizimana Justin was very young at the time, he wants his older sister to tell him about their family, ethnic discrimination, and the many hardships that she went through after the genocide. Since he has no other adult to turn to, Hakizimana Justin also asks Musayimana Epiphanie for advice about how he should behave in different settings. As any good older sister would do, she advises him on the proper way to live his life.

Gasani Gerarid & Rukiriza Antoine

CIMG0192.jpg

Rukiriza Antoine wants to join the army, so he decides to ask his father, Gasani Gerarid, about his own military service. Gasani Gerarid joined the Burundian army after he fled Rwanda during the 1970’s. He says that it was a very good experience, so he supports his son’s decision to fight for his country. However, Gasani Gerarid also stresses the importance of working hard and supporting a family. Even if Rukiriza Antoine is unable to join the army, his father says that he must find a way to use his skills to make a living.

Tabaruka Jeannine & Unnultoza Christine

SFH0062_B.JPG

Tabaruka Jeannine and Unnultoza Christine discuss the reason that Unnultoza Christine grew up without her father and brother. Unnultoza Christine has several questions surrounding their deaths during the genocide. Tabaruka Jeannine does her best to answer these questions so that her daughter may understand her family's history, but more importantly so she can move past the harsh realities of Rwanda's past and begin planning her future. Tabaruka Jeannine relates her past to help Unnultoza Christine realize that she is not alone in her struggles and that they are surmountable.

Mukamudenge Angela & Ndarihoranye Gaston

SFH0070_B.JPG

Mukamudenge Angela describes her parents' lifestyle to her son: how they farmed, how they told stories, and how that life has changed in her son's lifetime. Her stories illustrate a simpler life; her parents relied on their hands rather than books to do their work, and children could always find guidance from the elders sitting around the fireplace. Mukamudenge Angela hopes that her stories and a better understanding of previous generations will lead her son to both appreciate the benefits of a changing Rwanda, and learn from his family's past.

Ingabire Pascaline & Umuhoza Fanny

SFH0073_A.JPG

Umuhoza Fanny asks her mother, Ingabire Pascaline, many of the questions she's wondered about for years: what country were you born in, how did you meet your husband, what was life as a refugee like, and many more. Ingabire Pascaline answers her daughter's questions and explains their family's history. She also tells Umuhoza Fanny how lucky she is to have grown up with a mother. Ingabire Pascaline describes how hard her father worked to provide for his children, how the loss of her mother at a young age affected her life, and why she credits patience for her success today.

Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney & Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose

SFH0075.JPG

Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney and his daughter Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose use this opportunity to discuss the origins and causes of the 1994 genocide on both personal and national levels. Sakindi Jean Marie describes to Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose how close he and his wife came to death and what life was like in the years leading up to the genocide. They hid in closets, relied on the kindness of their neighbors, and turned to faith to keep them hopeful and lead them to forgiveness. Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose details how she and her classmates try to prevent conflict in their country.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

Recent Stories