Home

Kigali

Rwamucyo Denys & Hadasa Esther

IMG_2270.jpg

Hadasa Esther respects her uncle, Rwamucyo Denys, and wants to know his life history. Rwamucyo Denys tells her about the identity cards that they were forced to carry before the war and how his family fled to Burundi to escape violence. Hadasa Esther asks her uncle many questions about the nature of ethnic discrimination and he reminds her that “All of us are Rwandese” and should be united. Despite the many hardships Rwamucyo Denys has been through, he wants his niece to stay positive and always concentrate on doing what is right.

Mudenge Leopard & Manzi Erick

CIMG0192.jpg

Although Manzi Erick is Mudenge Leopard’s brother, there are many things that he does not know about his sibling’s background. Mudenge Leopard tells his brother about his childhood, how he left home to earn a living, and emphasizes that the most important lesson he learned was to always strive to be on good terms with everyone. Manzi Erick asks important questions about how to get along with all people, including those who do not want to socialize or those from a different generation, and his brother offers advice.

Ingabire Janviere & Umurerwa Divine

IMG_2270.jpg

Ingabire Janviere wishes to tell her sister Umurerwa Divine about all of the hardships that she has faced in her life. How “life after war became too bad.” Yet despite all of these struggles, she trusted God, found people to help her, and she endured. Umurerwa Divine learned a lot from her sister, and she said that she will continue to pray that God helps her throughout the rest of her life.

Musabyimana Epiphanie & Hakizimana Justin

IMG_2270.jpg

Hakizimana Justin and Musabyimana Epiphanie are siblings who lost their parents during the genocide. Since Hakizimana Justin was very young at the time, he wants his older sister to tell him about their family, ethnic discrimination, and the many hardships that she went through after the genocide. Since he has no other adult to turn to, Hakizimana Justin also asks Musayimana Epiphanie for advice about how he should behave in different settings. As any good older sister would do, she advises him on the proper way to live his life.

Uwayezu Dieu Domme & Gota Issa

CIMG0192.jpg

Gota Issa asks his father, Uwayezu Dieu Domme, to explain the difference between how Rwandese lived in the past and how they live today. Uwayezu Dieu Domme takes this opportunity to describe how life was in Rwanda before ethnicities were brought by the white people. This was a time when Rwandese respected and helped each other, regardless of their background. Uwayezu Dieu Domme hopes that the Rwandese today can learn from the culture of their ancestors and start to respect each other once again. He notes that “the most important battle is to know history.”

Gasani Gerarid & Rukiriza Antoine

CIMG0192.jpg

Rukiriza Antoine wants to join the army, so he decides to ask his father, Gasani Gerarid, about his own military service. Gasani Gerarid joined the Burundian army after he fled Rwanda during the 1970’s. He says that it was a very good experience, so he supports his son’s decision to fight for his country. However, Gasani Gerarid also stresses the importance of working hard and supporting a family. Even if Rukiriza Antoine is unable to join the army, his father says that he must find a way to use his skills to make a living.

Gahizi Valgas & Nyinawintore Marlaine

IMG_2270.jpg

Gahizi Valgas begins his story by telling his niece, Nyinawintore Marlaine, about the first time that he realized that he was a refugee. He describes the hardships that he and his family went through because they were not welcomed. He encourages his niece to continue her schooling, because in the past not everyone was given the right to education. He hopes that Nyinawintore Marlaine will fight against anything that could cause another genocide, because he does not want Rwandese to be forced to live as refugees again.

Tabaruka Jeannine & Unnultoza Christine

SFH0062_B.JPG

Tabaruka Jeannine and Unnultoza Christine discuss the reason that Unnultoza Christine grew up without her father and brother. Unnultoza Christine has several questions surrounding their deaths during the genocide. Tabaruka Jeannine does her best to answer these questions so that her daughter may understand her family's history, but more importantly so she can move past the harsh realities of Rwanda's past and begin planning her future. Tabaruka Jeannine relates her past to help Unnultoza Christine realize that she is not alone in her struggles and that they are surmountable.

Musabyimouna Edith & Lemurunyai Sandrine

SFH0064.JPG

Musabyimouna Edith tells her daughter how she went from being a lazy, spoiled daughter, to a hardworking survivor and mother. She describes how she was able to survive the genocide partially through her own willingness to change, but largely through the benevolence of strangers who were willing to hide, clothe and feed her during the violence. In order to survive, Musabyimouna Edith relied on strangers to conceal her identity and endured several close encounters with potentially violent individuals.

Mukantwali Félicita & Rutiganda Rigobert

SFH0069_B (1).JPG

Mukantwali Felicita and her son discuss their family’s history; Felicita’s life as a refugee and orphan, and how lucky Rutiganda Rigobert is to have an emerging and improving Rwanda in his future. Together they discuss how Rutiganda Rigobert can become a part of a new generation that prizes education, learns from the Rwanda’s past, and moves Rwanda forward in education, culture and health. Their conversation touches on a variety of subjects ranging from the causes of the genocide to relationship advice.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

Recent Stories