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Mukamudenge Angela & Ndarihoranye Gaston

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Mukamudenge Angela describes her parents' lifestyle to her son: how they farmed, how they told stories, and how that life has changed in her son's lifetime. Her stories illustrate a simpler life; her parents relied on their hands rather than books to do their work, and children could always find guidance from the elders sitting around the fireplace. Mukamudenge Angela hopes that her stories and a better understanding of previous generations will lead her son to both appreciate the benefits of a changing Rwanda, and learn from his family's past.

Ingabire Pascaline & Umuhoza Fanny

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Umuhoza Fanny asks her mother, Ingabire Pascaline, many of the questions she's wondered about for years: what country were you born in, how did you meet your husband, what was life as a refugee like, and many more. Ingabire Pascaline answers her daughter's questions and explains their family's history. She also tells Umuhoza Fanny how lucky she is to have grown up with a mother. Ingabire Pascaline describes how hard her father worked to provide for his children, how the loss of her mother at a young age affected her life, and why she credits patience for her success today.

Mukansanze Imfura Chantal & Turatsinze Jimmy

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Mukansanze Imfura Chantal explains to Turatsinze Jimmy how he became an orphan and how he got to where he is today. She urges him to continue his education and, equally importantly, to treat everyone as equals, regardless of ethnicity, wealth, or status, not only for himself, but for the future of the country. Turatsinze Jimmy describes his hazy memories as a young boy about the origins of genocide—why did a plane crash start a war? Was there already a plan in place to start the killing? Has there always been a rift between ethnicities?

Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney & Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose

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Sakindi Jean Marie Vianney and his daughter Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose use this opportunity to discuss the origins and causes of the 1994 genocide on both personal and national levels. Sakindi Jean Marie describes to Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose how close he and his wife came to death and what life was like in the years leading up to the genocide. They hid in closets, relied on the kindness of their neighbors, and turned to faith to keep them hopeful and lead them to forgiveness. Sakindi Uwera Marie Rose details how she and her classmates try to prevent conflict in their country.

Murekatete Justine & Tuyiseuge Claudette

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Two sisters orphaned by genocide, Murekatete Justine and Tuyiseuge Claudette, discuss how they can recover from the trauma they endured. Tuyiseuge Claudette tells her sister of the trouble she has remaining motivated to stay in school and continue working for her future. Murekatete Justine responds with her own inspirational story about raising two children and her sister singlehandedly.

Kayiranga Celestin & Mukasine Dafrose

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At Mukasine Dafrose's request, Kayiranga Celestin recounts the story of Rwabugiri and Rwanyonga. The story of a king and his highest confidant and the jealousy and hostility between them. The events that transpire during a hunting trip, a contest, and a wedding, communicate to Mukasine Dafrose that heroism comes in many forms and allows her to compare modern life with the ways of the past. Kayiranga Celestin uses this folk tale to encourage Mukasine Dafrose to be heroic in her daily life by living in harmony and being hospitable to those in need.

Nyirasamaza Anunciata & Byiringiro Alexis

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Nyirasamaza Anunciata and Byiringiro Alexis discuss their family's history, including why Byiringiro Alexis has never met his father, how Nyirasamaza Anunciata met her first and second husband, and what it has meant for both of them that she was widowed. Their loss as a family because of the 1994 genocide and the effects it has had come to the forefront and are openly discussed between mother and son. Byiringiro Alexis admits that he struggles seeing the purpose of continuing his education and asks his mother why he has faced such difficulties in his life.

Niyiguba Emmanuel & Rugira Jean Rene

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Older brother Niyiguba Emmanuel explains in great detail the genocide that resulted in the brothers' loss of several siblings and one parent. Rugira Jean Rene recounts to his brother the details of the genocide and ethnic discrimination that he is familiar with and Niyiguba Emmanuel elaborates on these facts with more details and additional information, helping his younger brother to understand his country's and family's history better.

Pastor Ruhagararabahurga Eric & Munganyinka Daima Lydia

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Pastor Ruhagararabahurg Eric describes to Munganyinka Daima Lydia how he made a fulfilling life for himself. After joining the army and fighting to protect the President, Pastor Eric realized that his true passion lies with protecting and helping others. He then became a man of God and devoted his life to helping street children find a better life in Rwanda. He describes to Daima Lydia how this journey toward faith allowed him to realize the significance of faith in reconciliation for Rwanda; forgiveness must be coupled with repentance in order to begin the healing.

Mukamageza Chaste & Uwayezo Janvier

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Uwayezo Janvier and his landlord, Mukamageza Chaste, discuss techniques to finding a successful marriage like Mukamageza Chaste's. What should he do so that his wife will be happy? What must he never do that would hurt his wife? How do you deal with differences within the couple? He admires the life Mukamageza Chaste has managed to create for herself and asks her how this was possible for her.

ARTICLE PUBLISHED

SEPTEMBER 2014 - Archival Science 14 (Nos. 3-4, 2014): 275-306. Available here

FOUNDER PASICK WINS PRESTIGIOUS PURPOSE FELLOW PRIZE

OCTOBER 2014 - Founder and Director Patricia Pasick, Ph.D. has been honored as a 2014 Purpose Prize Fellow which recognizes “outstanding social innovators over aged 60 who are working to change the world by finding solutions to challenging social problems.“
http://www.encore.org/patricia-pasick

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